Rich Dad Poor DadBefore anything else, let me give you a little background as to how I first learned about this book and why I read it.

I have a brother in law that recommended the book a few years ago. He had two copies, one was autographed by the other, the other, was well read, which is the one he loaned to me. I took it home and read the introduction. I had some interest but I couldn’t help but think that Robert Kiyosaki was lying the whole time. I did some research on the internet and found John T. Reed’s analysis of the book which in my mind confirmed my suspicions about the author. So after only reading the first chapter I gave the book back and said I wasn’t interested in reading any further.

If you have read any of my previous posts, you know I’m a big Dave Ramsey fan. I was surprised to heard Dave often recommending this book to everyone on the radio, even though he is often disagreeing with Kiyosaki on other financial matters.

In the meantime my brother-in-law’s business has started turning a profit and another friend of mine that also recommended the book has continued to build his business. So I thought, what the heck, I’ll get the audio book from the library and listen in my spare time.

I have to admit there were many times in the book that I still thought his stories were a bunch of bunk and I still find John T. Reed’s site more accurate. Kiyosaki tells very detailed stories about when he was nine years old.

But on the other hand, I did appreciate a new way of looking at a few things. His definition of an asset is an interesting one and made me reevaluate what I would consider an asset.

All in all, I don’t think I’ll read anything else from Kiyosaki, nor will I ever claim to be a Kiyosaki fan, but I am glad that I read the book. It gave me a new perspective on certain ideas. This book alone will not make anyone rich because I don’t think it has any real usable advice, but the value comes in how you look at life and business. It will make you think and that is always a good thing.